Personal and public

 

Survival

I spoke to the Truth Project on March 9, 2018. This is the first time I have tried to put what happened to me on the public record. Talking to the Truth Project was more intense, and also more satisfying, than I had expected.

I was telling them about things that happened in Cornwall over sixty-five years ago. Those events are, as I said to them, remote in both space and time. They still have power.

When I had finished l was asked for recommendations. I was at a loss for a moment. When I had recovered myself l was emphatic that schools should never assume that any child is innately bad.

I was supported by an Independent Sexual Violence Adviser from Survivors UK. I did not ask her to attend the meeting with me. I did not feel it was necessary.

Following a referral from the Truth Project I spoke to Devon and Cornwall Police on April 3, 2018. The referral to the police happened rather more quickly than I expected.

Devon and Cornwall Police have recorded two incidents involving my mother and my brother, who are both dead. There will be no further action. I have a crime number.

They have also put my account of group abuse at around the same time on the system. If anyone responds they may get back to me. It is not highly likely.

The police were courteous and professional. Twenty-five years ago I do not think they would have been. I do not think I would have been taken seriously if I had reported historic abuse, as we have learned to call it, especially if my memories had not always been conscious.

I am satisfied that what happened is finally on the record. I feel I have done my duty as a citizen.

I made an application to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board. It was refused. The criminal acts occurred before August 1, 1964. They don’t qualify.

This is not quite finished. I am not sure what I still have to do.

 

 

Photo credit: [ changó ] on VisualHunt / CC BY-NC-ND